Clinicians Fail to Address Menopausal Symptoms in Women Treated for Breast Cancer - Ellen Dolgen
Search
Close this search box.

Clinicians Fail to Address Menopausal Symptoms in Women Treated for Breast Cancer

Clinicians Fail to Address Menopausal Symptoms in Women Treated for Breast Cancer

A medical survey led by the University of Southampton (located in the South Coast of England) shows that hot flashes are one of the most common complaints for women who have been treated for breast cancer, however few clinicians take the time to discuss the problem with their patients. Research shows that more than 70% of women with breast cancer experience menopausal symptoms for as long as 5 years after treatment has ended. Further research is needed to find interventions that meet the needs of this special population. This research was presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference.

Transplant of Stem-Cell-Derived Dopamine Neurons Shows Promise for Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is an incurable movement disorder that affects millions of people around the world, but current treatment options can cause severe side effects and lose effectiveness over time. Parkinson’s disease is caused, in part, by the death of neurons that release a brain chemical called dopamine, leading to the progressive loss of control over dexterity and the speed of movement. In a new study, researchers showed that transplantation of neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, hESCs, can restore motor function in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease, paving the way for the use of cell replacement therapy in human clinical trials.

Obesity Increases Risk of Certain Breast Tumors Among African American and Hispanic Women

Two large new studies provide compelling evidence that obesity increases the risk of the most common type of postmenopausal breast cancer among both African Americans and Hispanics. Over one of every two African American woman and almost one of every two Hispanic woman is obese. The first study, published today in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, is the largest of its kind among Hispanic women.   The Cancer Prevention Institute of California, analyzed 3,200 Hispanic women and found that those who gain weight through adulthood – especially after menopause – had a higher risk for estrogen receptor-negative and progesterone receptor-positive breast tumors. The other study, by epidemiologist Elisa V. Bandera, MD, PhD, at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and her colleagues analyzed the associations of obesity with different hormone-receptor types among over 15,000 African American women, finding that excess weight is linked with a 31 percent increased of ER positive tumors in postmenopausal Black women.

Osteoporosis Screening Guidelines Miss Many Younger Post-Menopausal Women

A new UCLA-led study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, however, finds that the USPSTF strategy predicted only slightly more than one fourth of the women who went on to experience major osteoporotic fractures within 10 years. The study also found that two older osteoporosis risk-assessment tools were not much better. “If we want to prevent fractures, we need tools that help us accurately predict who will suffer these osteoporotic injuries so that we can target these at-risk people for preventive measures,” said Dr. Carolyn Crandall, professor of medicine in the division of general internal medicine and health services research at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and the study’s primary investigator. “Our results suggest that our current guidelines for screening in younger post-menopausal women do not accurately identify who will suffer a fracture.”

Share:

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get The Latest Updates

Subscribe To MENOPAUSE MONDAYS® Blog

No spam, notifications only about new products, updates.

Social Media

Categories

On Key

Related Posts

Two women sitting on a couch with a beverage in hand talking and laughing

The Secret to Longevity: The Role of Social Connectedness

Welcome back to Menopause Mondays®! Today, we’re shifting our focus from the menopausal transition to a relevant topic at any stage of life: the importance of social connectedness in promoting longevity. There were several ongoing research studies and findings related to longevity and social connections. It turns out that staying socially engaged can be a

Yellow stethoscope and red heart

Know Your Risks for Heart Disease

Hello, fabulous ladies, and welcome to a special Heart Health Month edition of Menopause Mondays®! Today, we’re diving deep into the topic of heart health and focusing on something vital – knowing your risks for heart disease. While menopause brings its own changes and challenges, understanding and managing these risks can make a world of

Embracing Self-Love During Menopause

Welcome to another Menopause Mondays®, a day dedicated to supporting and empowering women through the challenging yet transformative journey of menopause. In today’s blog, we’re going to delve into a topic that’s essential during this phase of life – self-love. Menopause is a time of change, and learning to love and care for yourself is

Are Women Living Longer Than Men?

Welcome to another edition of Menopause Mondays®. While I typically focus on women’s health during menopause, today, we’re diving into the widening gender gap in life expectancy. Recent data from the National Center for Health Statistics reveals that women in the United States now live an average of 5.8 years longer than men, from a

Scroll to Top

If you want to educate your employees, colleagues, or friends about menopause, look no further!

Share via
Copy link