How Does Menopause Affect Women At Work?

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Happy National Women’s Health Week!!

Women Going Through Menopause Need To Be Better Supported At Work

All women go through the menopause, and most women work, so how does the menopause affect women at work? New results indicate that many women need more managerial support going through the menopause; otherwise their experience could be lost to the workforce. The Women at Work study looked at health and well-being in working women, with a special emphasis on experiences close to the menopause.

The World Congress On The Menopause  Debated The Benefits And Risks Associated With Regular Mammography

Doctors at the World Congress on the Menopause have asked that any decision to participate in mammography to be a based on an informed choice and consideration of all factors, rather than just be an automatic process.

Studies Find ‘Young Blood’ Reverses Effects Of Aging In Mice

Could the elixir of youth be as simple as a protein found in young blood? Researchers studying mice found that giving old animals blood from young ones can reverse some signs of aging, and last year one team identified a growth factor in the blood that they think is partly responsible for the anti-aging effect on a specific tissue–the heart. Now that group has shown this same factor can also rejuvenate muscle and the brain. Do you know what GDF11 is?

Improved Survival In Cancer Patients With High Vitamin D Levels

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism reported that researchers have found that higher levels of circulating vitamin D on diagnosis of cancer are associated with significantly better survival and remission rates.

New Info On The Alcohol/Cancer Link

According to the 2014 World Cancer Report (WCR), issued by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), when it comes to cancer, no amount of alcohol is safe. Alcoholic beverages can contain at least 15 carcinogenic compounds, including acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, and lead. The more alcohol that a person drinks, the higher the risk. The alcohol/cancer link has been strengthened by the finding of a dose/response relationship between alcohol consumption and certain cancers. A causal relationship exists between alcohol consumption and cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, colon-rectum, liver, and female breast; a significant relationship also exists between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer.

After struggling with her own severe menopause symptoms and doing years of research, Ellen resolved to share what she learned from experts and her own trial and error. Her goal was to replace the confusion, embarrassment, and symptoms millions of women go through–before, during, and after menopause–with the medically sound solutions she discovered. Her passion to become a “sister” and confidant to all women fueled Ellen’s first book, Shmirshky: the pursuit of hormone happiness. As a result of the overwhelming response from her burgeoning audiences and followers’ requests for empowering information they could trust, Ellen’s weekly blog, Menopause MondaysTM, was born.

  • You know, there is a big part of me that believes that calling meno out as something that we need to accommodate at work plays into the idea that women should not be in responsible management positions. My feeling is that it’s normal and natural and we can deal with it, it’s not a disability….

  • Ellen Dolgen

    I know what you are saying, Carol. There is a fine line here. Nearly half of America’s workforce is now comprised of women, and three-fourths of households are headed by a working single parent, or two working parents.I do think that menopause should be part of corporate health education and awareness programs. Speaking openly about this stage in a women’s life will help to end the shame. You can’t leave your menopause on the kitchen counter when you go to work. It comes with you. Women need to learn how to handle the symptoms of menopause so that they remain happy, healthy and productive in the workplace!

  • I’m only now realizing how lucky I am that my symptoms are limited to flashes. No emotional swinging. No other physical difficulties.

    • Ellen Dolgen

      Every women’s journey is different, Diane. No one-size-fits all! Some women have no symptoms at all! The key is to take control of your own health and get the help you need and deserve!

  • Carol brings up an interesting point. I think we obviously have to get the subject of menopause out in the open but can’t make it be seen as a reason not to hire women or promote them to senior positions. You’re providing lots of great information here, which will enable women to take control of their bodies.

    • Ellen Dolgen

      I totally agree with you, Lois! When you enter perimenopause – find a menopause specialist and take control of your symptoms! No need to have a bump in the road. Be proactive about your health and not reactive!

  • Gawd…. Somethings are easier to just deal with than others. For example, I remember the day I was front and center in a high powered retreat, facilitating a Board of Directors Strategic Planning session when my internal furnace fired up – full force – and sent waves of heat from my gut to every extremity! My hair was plastered to my drenched head and I knew I had no time to lose my confidence or I would undermine the work! I just ran faster from white board to easel pad, hoping that they would think I was just working so hard that I was sweating…. My point is this: I am not sure that awareness of the issue would have made anything better — it may just be that young women know that this might happen to them…. Maybe I could have been better prepared but preparing the workplace? I am not sure that breeds anything but, as Carol said so well, looking at menopause a disability. Would love to know your thoughts on this Ellen!

    • Ellen Dolgen

      OMG…Ruth – that is quite the story! I don’t think menopause is a disability….but if you don’t educate yourself on this time in your life and understand what your options are – then your menopause CAN disable you! I have many women who are basing their health decisions on fear instead of facts…afraid to get help for their hot flashes, memory loss, sleeplessness and painful sex! These issues – when untreated WILL affect your every day life and your ability to function at your fullest. There is no reason to suffer in silence! So- talking about Menopause in the Workplace is GOOD! It brings awareness and helps to educate the powerful and growing female population in the workplace!

  • I, too, think bringing menopause into the workplace discussion is a slippery slope. I work in a small office where we are pretty open with each other, but I would keep it to myself in a corporate environment, rather than making it an HR issue. But I’m grateful for the support of my sisterhood to help me navigate my way through this time of my life.

    • Ellen Dolgen

      I understand the fear…but being a women is not a disease it is an asset. Talking about it in the workplace is healthy and necessary. BTW men also have age related issues and go through male menopause! They could benefit from healthy discussions on this topic as well!

      • Agreed. The healthy dialogue is important.

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